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Our Aircraft

Check out the fleet used to build The Aviator Gin Bar.

G-BLAI - Monnett Sonerai II

The Sonerai is a small, VW-powered homebuilt aircraft, designed by John Monnett. The Sonerai began to compete as a single-seat, mid-wing, tailwheel Formula-V racer class formed in 1972. The Sonerai soon evolved into a two-seat model called the Sonerai II.

Inspired by the Spitfire, an elliptical tail profile was incorporated. Elliptical wingtips and a low-wing configuration were dropped, but a low-wing Sonerai II variant was released later. The Sonerai I was designed to use a direct drive 1,600cc VW engine and the Sonerai II was designed to use the 1700cc VW engine.

G-BTNC - Eurocopter AS365 Dauphin

The Eurocopter (now Airbus Helicopters) AS365 Dauphin (pronounced 'doh-fan'), also formerly known as the Aérospatiale SA 365 Dauphin 2, is a medium-weight multipurpose twin-engine helicopter produced by Airbus Helicopters. It was originally developed and manufactured by French firm Aérospatiale, which was merged into the multinational Eurocopter company during the 1990s. Since entering production in 1975, the type has been in continuous production for more than 40 years. The intended successor to the Dauphin is the Airbus Helicopters H160, which is yet to enter operational service as of January 2020.

G-CELH - Boeing 737-300

The Boeing 737 is a narrow-body aircraft produced by Boeing at its Renton Factory in Washington. Developed to supplement the Boeing 727 on short and thin routes, the twinjet retains the 707 fuselage cross-section and nose with two underwing turbofans. Envisioned in 1964, the initial 737-100 made its first flight in April 1967 and entered service in February 1968 with Lufthansa. The lengthened 737-200 entered service in April 1968. It evolved through four generations, offering several variants for 85 to 215 passengers.

Development began in 1979 for the 737's first major revision, which was originally introduced as the 'new generation' of the 737. Boeing wanted to increase capacity and range, incorporating improvements to upgrade the aircraft to modern specifications, while also retaining commonality with previous 737 variants. In 1980, preliminary aircraft specifications of the variant, dubbed 737-300, were released at the Farnborough Airshow. This first major upgrade series was later renamed to the 737 Classic series.

D-AGEP - Boeing 737-700

The Boeing 737 is a narrow-body aircraft produced by Boeing at its Renton Factory in Washington. Developed to supplement the Boeing 727 on short and thin routes, the twinjet retains the 707 fuselage cross-section and nose with two underwing turbofans. Envisioned in 1964, the initial 737-100 made its first flight in April 1967 and entered service in February 1968 with Lufthansa. The lengthened 737-200 entered service in April 1968. It evolved through four generations, offering several variants for 85 to 215 passengers.

The 737-700, the first variant of the Next-Generation, was launched in November 1993. The -700 seats 126 passengers in a two-class or 149 passengers in a one-class layout. The launch customer Southwest Airlines took the first delivery in December 1997.

A7-AGC - Airbus A340-600

The A340-600 is the largest-capacity member of Airbus’ A340 Family, with an overall length of 75.36 metres and accommodations for 320 to 370 passengers (or 475 in high-density seating). The aircraft – which can be used effectively in commercial, corporate or government operations – includes state-of-the-art technologies such as weight-saving composite structures and a fuel-saving aerodynamic design, along with pilot-friendly cockpits, flight controls and systems.

EC-MFB - Airbus A340-300

With a service range of 7,400 nautical miles, Airbus’ A340-300 is tailored to meet the needs of the 250-290-seat long-range market – offering direct point-to-point services and increased flight frequencies at lower costs. As flagships with smaller airlines, A340-300s provide vital long-range links to and from less populous cities; while serving as a cost-effective 250-290-seat long-range complement for operators of A320 Family aircraft.

UR-WRO - Airbus A321-200

The A320 is one aircraft in four sizes (A318, A319, A320 and A321), representing the most successful and versatile jetliner family ever. Seating from 100 to 240 passengers and flying throughout the world, with the widest single-aisle cabin, an A320 takes off or lands every 1.6 seconds. From the heat of the desert to icy Antarctic runways, or from short runway urban environments to remote high-altitude airports, the A320 can take passengers anywhere.